WRITING: PARALLELISM December 4, 2017...

WRITING:  PARALLELISM                                                December 4, 2017 Our writing should flow well for our readers. When we write parts of the sentence in parallel fashion, we keep things logical, clear, and easy to read. Parallelism gives the sentence a sense of coordination and unity, rhythm and power. One of the best examples of parallelism came from President Abraham Lincoln: “. . . that the government of the people, by the people, and for the people shall not perish from the earth.” Now, compare the following examples: Nonparallel: I’ve spent the past week reading, some writing, and I took long walks. That sentence jolts readers, causing them to pause and think between the two independent clauses.   They think, “Wait a second. I have to read this again. What’s the writer talking about? Is a word or two missing? It feels weird. Shouldn’t it be worded in a different way?” Now, look at how the next sentence differs. Parallel: I’ve spent the past week reading, writing, and taking long walks. By contrast, the second sentence–one independent clause–flows smoothly because of the use of parallelism in the gerunds “reading,” “writing,” and “taking.” The sentence is parallel and easy to read within an economy of words. In this lesson we have given you...

WRITING: ELUSIVE TERMS November 25, 2017...

WRITING: ELUSIVE TERMS                    November 25, 2017 For speaking and writing, the dictionary defines “elusive” as follows:  “eluding one’s clear perception; hard to express or define; skillfully evasive.”   Some words in the English language are elusive.   Such words may seem to add substance or description to our communications, and some can be helpful in verbal situations. In writing, however, they rarely add anything to the cause. In fact, they often interfere with reader comprehension. Some examples of elusive terms are:  all that, all that much, very, just, rather, somewhat, quite, like, at that point in time.  Let’s discuss each of them.   Maybe you’ve noticed that usage of “all that“ ranges from interesting to irritating. In a form of modern slang, some GenXers sometimes say, “She thinks she’s all that.” To the rest of us, what IS “all that“? It seems to mean, for example, that a girl considers herself to be the best, and her attitude shows in her snobbish behavior. In another example, some say, “I didn’t like it all that much,” such as while testing a product in a marketing survey. The listener, though, doesn’t know what “that” is or the speaker’s basis for comparison; as a result, he/she is left to wonder, “How much is that much?” Speakers...

DANCING WITH THE STARS SEASON 25, FALL 2017, WEEK 10 FINALE!...

DANCING WITH THE STARS SEASON 25, FALL 2017, WEEK 10 FINALE! Dear DWTS Fans:  Welcome back!   It’s Week 10, night 2 of the FINALS, the FINALE of Season 25–Tuesday, November 21, 2017, 9-11 p.m.!  Tom and Erin hosted; as usual, Tom spent most of his time in the ballroom indoors while Erin spent most of hers at The Grove outdoors. Carrie Ann Inaba (CAI), Len Goodman, Julianne Hough, and Bruno Tonioli judged.   THE CURRENT CAST:  Actor Frankie Muniz (formerly “Malcolm”) & pro Witney Carson (1-800-868-3405) Actor/Singer/Dancer Jordan Fisher & pro Lindsay Arnold (1-800-868-3406) Electronic Violinist Lindsey Stirling & pro Mark Ballas*             (1-800-868-3407) *(2-Time MBT winner)   Ballroom & Latin Dances: Foxtrot, Quickstep, Waltz, Viennese Waltz, Tango, Argentine Tango, Jive, Jazz, Charleston, Contemporary; Cha-Cha, Samba, Salsa, Rumba, Paso Doble.  “Learn the dance, learn the steps, then learn the character of it.” — Len Goodman Tues., Nov. 21, 2017:   All 13 couples return in a Christmas spectacular both at The Grove (outdoors) and in the ballroom, as usual, opening to “Dancing in the Street.” Each couple will do two dances: (1)  a repeat of their fave this season; (2) the usual “24-Hour Fusion Challenge” (a new routine fusing two contrasting dance styles, prepared just since last evening). FIRST DANCE: ...

DANCING WITH THE STARS SEASON 25, FALL 2017, WEEK 10 FINALS...

DANCING WITH THE STARS SEASON 25, FALL 2017, WEEK 10 FINALS Welcome back!   It’s Week 10, night 1 of the FINALE of Season 25–Monday, November 20, 2017!  Tom and Erin hosted. Carrie Ann Inaba (CAI), Len Goodman, Julianne Hough, and Bruno Tonioli judged THE FINALS!   THE CURRENT CAST:  “Property Brothers” Drew Scott & pro Emma Slater (1-800-868-3404) Actor Frankie Muniz (formerly “Malcolm”) & pro Witney Carson (1-800-868-3405) Actor/Singer/Dancer Jordan Fisher & pro Lindsay Arnold (1-800-868-3406) Electronic Violinist Lindsey Stirling & pro Mark Ballas* (1-800-868-3407) *(2-Time MBT winner) Ballroom & Latin Dances: Foxtrot, Quickstep, Waltz, Viennese Waltz, Tango, Argentine Tango, Jive, Jazz, Charleston, Contemporary; Cha-Cha, Samba, Salsa, Rumba, Paso Doble.  “Learn the dance, learn the steps, then learn the character of it.” — Len Goodman   Mon., Nov. 20, 2017:   The show opened with many pros and a few troupers dancing together to a number choreographed by Mandy Moore. Each couple will do two dances.   FIRST DANCE:  A Redemption Dance, Each Coached by One of the Judges   Drew Scott + Emma: Paso Doble with Bruno as Coach. Judges: 9. Me 9.  Drew  opened with 10 or 15 seconds of a solo, after which Emma danced in from across the floor and joined him.  Much improved in posture,...

DANCING WITH THE STARS SEASON 25, FALL 2017, WEEK 9...

DANCING WITH THE STARS SEASON 25, FALL 2017, WEEK 9 Dear DWTS Fans:  Welcome back!   Welcome to Week 9 of Season 25–Monday, November 13, 2017!  Tom and Erin hosted. Carrie Ann Inaba (CAI), Len Goodman, and Bruno Tonioli judged.  It’s Semifinals Night!   THE CURRENT CAST:  “Property Brothers” Drew Scott & pro Emma Slater (1-800-868-3404) Actor Frankie Muniz (formerly “Malcolm”) & pro Witney Carson (1-800-868-3405) Actor/Singer/Dancer Jordan Fisher & pro Lindsay Arnold (1-800-868-3406) Electronic Violinist Lindsey Stirling & pro Mark Ballas* (1-800-868-3407) Former Paralympic Swimmer Victoria Arlen & pro Val Chmerkovskiy (1-800-868-3413) *(2-Time MBT winner)   Ballroom & Latin Dances: Foxtrot, Quickstep, Waltz, Viennese Waltz, Tango, Argentine Tango, Jive, Jazz, Charleston, Contemporary; Cha-Cha, Samba, Salsa, Rumba, Paso Doble.  “Learn the dance, learn the steps, then learn the character of it.” — Len Goodman Mon., Nov. 13, 2017:   Each couple will do two dances.  The pros were allowed to choose their first dances.  For each, the second dance will be performed as a reinterpretation of sorts of an iconic song that was done in a previous season; I say that this is unfair to current contestants whose dances will be compared with those of contestants who won their seasons involving this dance. FIRST DANCE Drew Scott + Emma: Tango (“I’m...

WRITING: SENTENCES November 7, 2017...

WRITING:  SENTENCES                                                   November 7, 2017 In writing, if all sentences were the same type and of a similar length, reading could become less interesting.  Alternating sentence types and lengths, whenever possible, makes writing and reading more interesting.  Fortunately, we have three different types of sentences.   Simple:  I am going to cut the grass. Very-simple and very-short sentences are most often geared toward young children to suit their limited reading and/or comprehension levels.   Compound (more than one part):  I am going to cut the grass, and then I am going to trim the bushes. Compound sentences are for readers of average ability.   Complex:  I am going to cut the grass [Part 1, independent clause, complete thought/sentence], and then I am going to trim the bushes [Part 2, independent clause, complete thought/sentence], which is what all homeowners should do to take good care of their properties [Part 3, dependent clause, incomplete thought/sentence].   Complex sentences that contain short, easy-to-understand independent clauses and a short dependent clause also are usually for average readers.   However, a complex sentence can become more complex as more and...

« Previous Entries

© 2015 Writestyle. All Rights Reserved.